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ROZA ETKIN-MOSKOWSKA
Polish pianist (1908 - 1945)

 


Roza Etkin was a pupil of Aleksander Michałowski, himself a student of Moscheles, Tausig, Liszt and Mikuli, and of Zbigniew Drzewiecki who wrote of her, "absorption of [different] styles, rapidity of committing to memory, independence of her fingering technique and chord jumps she was incredible.... She had rather small hands and it seemed supernatural how she managed with all difficulties.".  She was the youngest entrant and 3rd prize winner at the first Fryderyk Chopin Competition in Warsaw. She had an enormous repertoire that ranged from Bach's Golberg Variations to the moderns of her day, Scriabin, Rachmaninoff, Ravel Prokofiev, Szymanowski, and Godowsky's arrangements of Chopin.  She was married to Moritz Moszkowski's brother, Ryszard, and both she and her husband were murdered by the Nazis in 1945, bringing to a tragic end what seems to have been, if I may so judge from the very few examples of her art to which I have access, the life of a phenomenal pianist.

The two Chopin pieces below much more than hint at a miraculous talent.  And Roza Etkin's performance of the Scriabin Étude is the one I would try to emulate were I able to do so.  I understand she recorded more than these three works,  I will do my best to unearth them.



Chopin Mazurka in C minor, Op 50~3
04:23 ➢ Chopin Nocturne in F major, Op 15~2

recorded in 1937




Scriabin  Étude in D minor, Op 8~12










For those of you who enjoy murder mysteries, here is my first with a strong musical polemic as background

Murder in the House of the Muse

which is also available as an audiobook.



And this is the more recently published second mystery in the series:

Murder Follows the Muse



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